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Reporters miss reporting on Bode Miller’s son

On Behalf of | Feb 21, 2014 | Child Custody

Alpine skier Bode Miller made history by being the oldest person to win an Olympic medal after his third place finish in the men’s Super-G competition. He told reporters that he didn’t have the run he was hoping for (which ostensibly would have won the competition) but it was good enough. Miller’s emotions boiled over during a post-race interview with NBC when he mentioned how he was thinking about his brother, who passed away last year after suffering a seizure.

The display of emotions led many reporters to say that Miller is revealing a softer side of himself after years of having an adversarial relationship with the media. While the comments about his brother were definitely heartfelt, many in the media overlooked the possible effect of having his son with him at the games could have had as well.

In a prior post, we highlighted the legal battle Miller endured with ex-girlfriend Sara McKenna in obtaining custody rights and parenting time with the couple’s son. While the two were living in California, McKenna became pregnant, and she and Miller eventually broke up. He initiated a paternity proceeding in California, and McKenna later moved to New York to attend college. While in New York, she gave birth to their son. She filed a custody petition in state court, and this touched off a contentious legal battle that included a public war of words between the two.

McKenna and Miller were eventually able to reach a temporary resolution regarding custody and parenting time, and Miller has performed reasonably well in what is likely his last Olympic games. It is an example of how parents can perform when they reach a compromise in custody disputes. 

Source: ABC News.com “Bode Miller breaks down after bronze medal finish,” Dan Good, Feb.17, 2014

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